Monday, April 5, 2010

At Ground Level

Caulophyllum thalictroides


Podophyllum sp. ( maybe versipelle)


Symplocarpus foetidus

This morning Marjorie Harris wrote in her blog about the pleasure of seeing plants break the surface of the soil, and this inspired me to photograph some of the plants that I've been enjoying at this very early stage. In fact looking at some of my pictures I noticed there is still a trace of soil on many of the plants that have perhaps only been above ground for 24 to 36 hours or less.
Some have shown signs of life for a few weeks now like the Symplocarpus foetidus ( one of the native plants stuck with the name of Skunk Cabbage), its strange flower has been shopping around for pollinators for weeks, but just today I've noticed some fresh new leaves have appeared from the base. This is all a reminder that plants are beautiful at most stages of life and this early one is often overlooked.

12 comments:

Sheila said...

Sweet!

Teza said...

Barry:
This is what I most love about the warm days of Spring. The newly emerging foliage is in some cases more spectacular than during the heady days of summer. Fabulous shots!

Barry Parker said...

Sheila, Glad you liked these. Hope to show them again when they are further along.

Barry Parker said...

Teza,
It has been an extraordinary holiday weekend hasn't it. So many plants are suddenly appearing. I'm so happy to be approaching Narcissus season, 'Tete a Tete" and 'Topolino' already in bloom in the front garden, and even more exciting N. minor in the rear garden. And finally 6 of the 25 bulbs of N. pseudonarcissus have appeared above ground.

. . . Lisa and Robb . . . said...

Call me crazy, but I *love* skunk cabbage, both the eastern and western kinds.

Is the Wiz said...

These are lovely photographs, so clear I felt I could smell damp earth. My favourite buds pushing through just now are peonies.

Barry Parker said...

Hi Lisa and Robb,
They are great plants aren't they? Symplocarpus has been in flower for weeks now, but I guess after pollination, the leaves start to appear. Any idea what pollinates these plants? Flies maybe?

Barry Parker said...

Hi Whiz,
I notice you're from Scotland and wonder if you are far north enough to have similar climate as Southern Ontario? Or perhaps you are on the balmy west coast? Anyway here we've had a mild winter an early Spring so Peonies are making their presence felt.

Is the Wiz said...

Dear Barry,I live near Edinburgh but we've a strange microclimate, hills on three sides but open to the north-east, a bit of a frost pocket. This winter's been the worst for forty years, but the April forecast is promising. I'm looking out for the swallows, they're usually here around the 20th.

Barry Parker said...

Hi Iz,
That explains the similarity in our climates ( this year at least). I suyppose you must have winds coing down that N.E. gap from northern Europe.

Mandarin said...

one can talk about beginnings and connected cliche. beautiful. :)

Barry Parker said...

Manderin,
Cliches are not necessarily a negative thing. Change, decay and rebirth are inevitable.