Monday, April 12, 2010

In the Garden Today


Helleborus x hybridus



Helleborus x hybridus



Salix sp.



Foliage of Tulipa greigii 'Red Riding Hood'



Tulipa humilis violacea

There is so much happening in the garden at the moment that it's hard to focus on one family of plants or to stick to some theme or concept. So quite simply here are things I saw in the garden today. The hellebores are at their best right now and the species tulips are just starting. And although a clump of Tulipa 'Red Riding Hood' seem to have come up blind, they have made up for this with an amazing show of patterning on their leaves. I may have been premature showing the Salix in the post of a few weeks ago, because they are even more startling now that their catkins are heavy with pollen; but perhaps it is just as well that I show them at various times of growth for they are beautiful at all stages.

9 comments:

allanbecker-gardenguru said...

Do you remember where you found Tulipa humilis?

Edith Hope said...

Dear Barry, Your garden must be a picture at the moment and I do so enjoy the tantalising little snippets which you present your readers with.

Tulipa g. 'Red Riding Hood' I grew for a number of years in containers and, like you, I found the foliage most appealing. You have prompted me to go back to it again when I do my bulb order in late August.

Your hellebores are, of course, lovely - all time favourites with me. Have you ever grown H, torquatus, I wonder?

kilbournegrove said...

I cannot believe that you thought your helleborus were boring, I think that they are quite lovely. Things are moving along rapidly now, aren't they.

Barry Parker said...

Hi Allen,
It's been a while since I first got these, but it was more than likely Gardenimports.

Barry Parker said...

Dear Edith,
I'm afraid I am a man of little snippets, it's hard for me to write at length about anything, but I hope I can at least put something of interest in my precis.
As for H. torquatus, many of my plants come from Farmyard Nurseries in mid-Wales, and I think they do a lot of hybridizing with that species. I think the green interiors are typical of offspring of that race as are picotees, and both those features are present in my plants.

Barry Parker said...

Hi Deborah,
Many of my Hellebores are boring, believe me. But there are a few I think are 'keepers'. Hope you can see them for yourself this week.

Is the Wiz said...

That back-lit hellebore is a stunning picture, love the colour contrasts. I think you'll find your Red Riding Hoods will soon show a flower bud. Thank you for your reply to my question about "peregrina", I'm fascinated by the roots of language and that was really good. The Red Peony of Constantinople is a fabulous name, and to think of it being introduced in 1583 sets off my imagination.

Barry Parker said...

Hi Is,
I wish I could claim to be a great photographer, but this little camera of mine does all the work. Most of the time I surprise myself at how well they turn out.
The great thing about corresponding this way is that questions lead to answers and more questions. I've had Paeonia peregrina for years and only now know it's history. From now on i'm calling it The Red Peony of Constantinople.

James Missier said...

your helibores look so glorious....
beautiful...